Care + Maintenance

Common questions, simple answers. We’ve got you covered.

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Care & Maintenance

What happens if natural stone is damaged?

Good news, Polybuilding offers stone restoration services! In most cases, it can be repaired but we will first assess it on a case-by-case basis.

Help! There are defects in my stone!

Much like gemstones, no two stones are alike! Each come with their own distinct characteristics and unique quirks. It comes with getting something straight from nature! However, if you are experiencing issues with your natural stone surface, we’d love to see how we can help! Please get in touch us via our Contact Page.

How should I clean natural stone?

You may clean the stone surfaces with a neutral cleaner, never a strong detergent. A mild liquid dish-washing soap, warm water and a clean cloth would suffice. Cleaning with excessive high concentrations or with harsh cleaners may lead to streaking. We suggest that you follow the manufacturer’s recommendation. In wet areas such as the bathrooms, you can minimise the soap scum but using a squeegee. To remove the scum, you can use non-acidic soap scum remover or a solution comprising of ammonia and water. However, do note that excessive or prolonged usage of this mixture may result in the dulling of certain stone surface types. For external areas such as outdoor pools, patios or jacuzzi areas, flushing with a mild bleach solution and water will do the trick for the removal of algae or moss.

How many times can you polish natural stone?

There is no particular limit, the number one enemy of maintaining a shine is grit, sand or particulate matter. These can cause micro scratches on surfaces, disrupting the shine. Polybuilding offer Polishing as part of its range of services. We can get your surface back to its shining and vibrant self in no time!

What should I clean natural stone with?

For suitable cleaning products, most DIY shops offer a range of products used for stone cleaning. 
 Steer clear of products containing lemon, vinegar or other acids may dull calcareous stones, while scouring powders or creams often contain abrasives that may scratch certain stones. Acidic chemicals containing hydrofluoric acid will attack silicates and other materials found in natural stone.